Skip to main content


I. GETTING HERE (AIRPORTS)

II. GETTING AROUND NEW YORK CITY

Getting Here

For those traveling by air, the City is served by LaGuardia Airport (LGA) and John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), both in Queens, and Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR) in neighboring New Jersey. All three airports provide access to the City via taxis, buses, subways and trains.

      John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK)
      Location: Jamaica, Queens, NY 11430
      718-244-4444
      This airport is New York's largest, serving more than 90 primarily international airlines. It is approximately 15 miles from Midtown Manhattan.

      Getting to Midtown Manhattan from JFK:
      Taxi: $45 flat fare (non-metered), plus bridge and tunnel tolls and gratuity; 30 to 60 minutes to Midtown Manhattan. 212-NYC-TAXI
      Subway: $7.25 ($5 for the AirTrain from JFK, plus $2.25 for the subway); 60 to 75 minutes to Midtown Manhattan from the A subway line at the Howard Beach/JFK Airport station or the E, J or Z subway lines at the Sutphin Blvd./Archer Ave./JFK Airport station.
      Public Bus: $2.25 (or free transfer from subway); 60 to 75 minutes to Midtown Manhattan on Q10 bus.

      LaGuardia Airport (LGA)
      Location: Jackson Heights, Queens, NY 11371
      718-533-3400
      This is New York's second-largest airport, with more than 20 airlines serving mostly domestic destinations, Canada and the Caribbean from four passenger terminals. It is on the northern shore of Queens, directly across the East River about eight miles from Midtown Manhattan.

      Getting to Manhattan from LaGuardia:
      Taxi: Metered fare; approximately $24-$28, plus bridge and tunnel tolls and gratuity; 20 to 25 minutes to Midtown Manhattan. 212-NYC-TAXI
      Public Bus: $2.25; 60 to 75 minutes to the Upper West Side via direct service on the M60 bus; for subway connections, board the Q33 bus and disembark at the Jackson Heights/Roosevelt Ave. subway station (E, F, R and V subway lines) or the 74th St./Broadway subway station (7 subway line) in Queens; add another 15 to 20 minutes for subway into Midtown Manhattan.

      Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR)
      Location: Newark, NJ 07114
      973-961-6000
      Newark Airport, with more than 30 airlines (many of them international), is across the Hudson River from New York City, 16 miles and 45 to 60 minutes from Midtown Manhattan.

      Getting to Midtown Manhattan from Newark Liberty:
      Taxi: Fares to Midtown Manhattan range from $50 to $60 (not including tolls and gratuity). During weekday rush hours (6-9am and 4-7pm) and on weekends (Saturday-Sunday, noon-8pm), there is a $5 surcharge to anywhere in New York State except Staten Island. When traveling to the airport from Midtown Manhattan, the fare is metered plus $15, in addition to tolls and gratuity.

Getting Around New York City

Getting a MetroCard is your first step to getting around on the subway or bus. It can be purchased at subway stations from either automated machines (which accept cash, ATM bank cards and regular credit cards) or from booth attendants. A single subway or bus ride is currently $2.25. Riders have the choice of buying a pay-per-ride MetroCard or an unlimited MetroCard. Pay-per-ride cards range in value from $4.50 to $80. The unlimited MetroCard allows users to ride as often as they like within a fixed time period: one day with the Fun Pass ($8.25), seven days ($27), 14 days ($51.50) or 30 days ($89). Varying discounts are given for multiple rides, as well as for seniors (over age 65) and disabled riders. For a New York City subway map, go to http://www.mta.info.

      MTA-Subways and Buses*
      If you can't walk to your destination, mass transit is the next-best way to get around. The City's rail and bus system is run by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) and known as MTA New York City Transit. It's inexpensive, environmentally friendly and a great way to see sights throughout the five boroughs-and it operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

      The system is accessible to passengers with visual, hearing and mobility disabilities. For more information, consult the MTA's accessibility guide and its list of accessible subway stations at www.mta.info/accessibility.

      Purchasing a MetroCard is your first step to getting around on subways and buses. You can buy a MetroCard at subway stations, from either automated machines (which accept cash, ATM bank cards and regular credit cards) or booth attendants (cash only). A single subway or bus ride is currently $2.25. Riders can buy a SingleRide card (cash only; must be used within two hours of purchase), a pay-per-ride card or an unlimited MetroCard. Pay-per-ride cards range in value from $4.50 to $100. An unlimited MetroCard allows users to ride as often as they like within a fixed time period: options include a one-day Fun Pass ($8.25) and unlimited cards that last for seven days ($27), 14 days ($51.50) or 30 days ($89). The MTA offers discounts for seniors (over age 65) and disabled riders, as well as a "bonus" credit of 15 percent for purchases of $8 or more on pay-per-ride cards-meaning that an $8 purchase buys $9.20 worth of rides, and so on.

      Subways
      The easiest and quickest way to travel around NYC is by public subway train. Riding the subway is also a fantastic way to feel like a local during your stay in New York.

      Fast facts:
      • Subway trains operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
      • For $2.25 (the cost of a single ride), you can use the system citywide and transfer as many times as you need, as long as you don't exit the system through a turnstile.
      • You can transfer from bus to subway or vice versa within two hours of using your MetroCard. (The free transfer does not apply if you leave a subway station through a turnstile and want to get on another subway line.)
      • Subway stations on the same line are generally about eight to 10 blocks apart.
      • The subway does not travel to Staten Island. To get there, board the free Staten Island Ferry or take a bus.

      You can get a free subway map from booth attendants or at any Official NYC Information Center, or download one from our Maps & Guides section. You can also visit tripplanner.mta.info for a customized route (but it's still a good idea to carry a subway map when you're out and about). The Trip Planner offers routes for MTA bus lines as well. Subway lines sometimes change routes or temporarily stop running-especially on weekends-so be sure to check for up-to-date MTA service information at mta.info or by calling 718-330-1234.

      Buses
      Public buses are a scenic way to see the City and reach destinations not convenient to a subway stop. It's also worth noting that mass transit is central to New York City's efforts to become more environmentally friendly, and a growing number of NYC's buses are hybrid-electric models.

      • All City buses accept the MetroCard and exact coin change (no pennies or paper money accepted).
      • Check the route sign on the front of the bus before boarding to ensure it's the bus you want, and make sure you know if it's making all stops or only "limited" stops (the limited buses don't make all stops along the route).
      • Enter and pay at the front of the bus.
      • A single ride costs $2.25 on a local bus and $5.50 on an express bus, and will take you any distance until the end of the route.
      • Many buses are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, but be sure to check whether your route offers overnight service. A schedule and route map posted at the bus stop indicate when the bus should arrive and where it will go.
      • Buses run about every five to 15 minutes, or at longer intervals, depending on the time of day.
      • Buses generally stop every other block on avenue routes and every block on cross-street routes. Late at night, from 11pm to 5am, bus drivers will stop wherever you ask them to-as long as they feel it's safe.
      • MTA service information is available at mta.info or by calling 718-330-1234.

      Taxis
      The City's yellow fleet of taxicabs is regulated by the Taxi & Limousine Commission (TLC). Grabbing a cab can be ideal when tired feet, heavy luggage or too many shopping bags weigh you down:
      • Taxis are available 24 hours a day.
      • Hail taxis whose numbers are illuminated on top.
      • Hotel doormen can hail a cab for you; a $1 tip is customary for this service.
      • Minimum metered fare is $2.50, which increases 40 cents every fifth of a mile; there is also a New York State tax surcharge of 50 cents per ride.
      • A $1 surcharge is added to the meter Monday-Friday, 4-8 p.m., and a 50-cent surcharge is added at night, 8pm-6am.
      • All taxis accept cash and most accept credit cards.
      • Tip 15-20% at the end of a trip; tolls are extra and added to the metered fare.
      If you're planning to drive around the City, use Google Maps to help you navigate New York City roads. Also, make sure you know where to park. You may want to use a site like bestparking.com to compare parking rates and locations from a number of companies.

      Other
      Walking and public transit are excellent ways to get around New York, but you can also travel the City by bike, pedicab, ferry or even helicopter if you so desire. Take a different route, and you just might see the City from a whole new angle.

Event Schedule

Dec. 28
New Era Pinstripe Bowl Game

Videos

More »